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Private Money Real Estate Investing

Please Note: This website is intended for educational purposes only!

Are you currently earning the return you want on your investment dollars? If not, you should be, and you can with private lending in real estate! Private money lending is a great alternative to the stock market, especially in these tough economic times.

Interested to find out how you can earn the returns you want, secured by real estate and insured? Click the link below and find out more about becoming a private money lender, and find out how you can build toward a fantastic retirement through private lending with real estate investments.

Learn more about private money real estate investing. Click here.

Why choose an IRA rollover?

Foremost, to avoid unnecessary taxation. When you become eligible for these benefits, you can access the money immediately, and pay tax penalties OR you can choose an IRA rollover. With the rollover option, your benefits are tax-exempt. And you will continue to grow these assets. Your retirement fund grows faster since it is not taxable and you are not required to report your yearly investment income or capital gains. If you want control of your retirement savings, a rollover takes the control from an employer plan and gives you the ability to make the decisions about your money. You decide when to take distributions, and how much to take. You might opt for a tax-free Roth instead of a Traditional IRA, changing the income in your retirement account. How you handle your account is up to you. With sound advice, careful planning, thoughtful management and smart investing your IRA Rollover can be a great asset that works for you. Remember, the transition should be simple and straightforward, but if you experience any difficulties you can seek technical advice from your tax advisor.

Learn more about your IRA rollover. Click here.

Roth IRA Contribution Limits 2011

January 8, 2012 by  
Filed under Private Money Lending

The Roth IRA contribution limits 2011 determine the maximum you can invest for retirement using individual retirement accounts. The traditional IRA and Roth IRA Contribution Limits 2011, plus the 2011 standard IRA deductibility limitations and the 2011 Roth IRA income limits, are all important factors.

Roth IRA Contribution Limits 2011

The Roth IRA contribution limits 2011 are unchanged from 2010. Beginning in 2008, the most you may contribute to a standard IRA per year is $5,000. But, if you will be 50 years of age or older by the end of the year, you can contribute an extra $1,000, for a $6,000 total IRA contribution limit. Keep in mind that you and/or your spouse are required to have earned income at least as great as the amount you contribute.

These restrictions apply to both regular and Roth IRAs. Even though you may be eligible to contribute to both plans, your combined contribution to both accounts may not exceed your limit above ($5,000 or $6,000).

Deductible Roth IRA Contribution Limits 2011

Although there is no maximum income cap for contributing to a standard IRA, there are income capst to deducting regular IRA contributions, which will be different based on marital status, income, and workplace retirement (e.g., 401(k), 403(b) plan eligibility).

Roth IRA Income Limits 2011

Unlike standard IRA contributions, not every worker can contribute to a Roth IRA. Based on one’s marital status and income, some upper earners are not eligible to contribute to Roth IRAs. However, since these plans are so beneficial to your strategy for retirement, be sure to understand the limits every year before deciding you don’t qualify.

2011 Roth Conversion Income Limitations

Even if you earn too much money for a direct Roth IRA contribution, you might have access to a Roth IRA via the backdoor. The opportunity to convert a regular IRA to a Roth IRA became accessible to all taxpayers regardless of income on the 1st of January, 2010. Previously, a conversion was only accessible to people who had a modified adjusted gross income of less than $100,000.

For more information, please visit the Roth IRA Contribution Limits 2011 info page.